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Chalcosoma caucasus (page 5)

The pupae of C. caucasus.

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The pupa of a medium-sized male C. caucasus.  Here, it has been removed from its protective cell for photographic purposes.  If done very carefully, it can be placed back into its natural cell unharmed, and there is also a technique for creating an artificial pupal cell when necessary.  This should only be attempted by very experienced professionals however, as removing a pupa from its cell can have disasterous consequences when the time comes for the adult beetle to emerge.

Photo courtesy of Fan Lin.

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Chalcosoma caucasus pupa (male) - Image  Fan Lin

 
Chalcosoma caucasus pupa (male) - Image  Fan Lin
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Another photo of the same pupa, this time showing a good view of the structures which contain the developing horns.  When the time of emergence finally arrives, the soft amber-coloured outer casing will become a thin, papery material which will be cast off and left behind inside the empty pupation cell.

Photo courtesy of Fan Lin.

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The pupa of a female C. caucasus.  Metamorphosis is probably the most complicated and potentially hazardous time in the life of an insect.  Hidden within their pupation cells, the pupae of Chalcosoma are not nearly so vulnerable as are those of species such as butterflies which pupate exposed in the open.
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Chalcosoma caucasus pupa (female) - Image  C. Campbell

 
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