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Chelorrhina polyphemus (page 2)

The 3rd instar larva of Chelorrhina polyphemus and pupal cell.

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A 3rd instar larva (male) of Chelorrhina polyphemusChelorrhina larvae are reasonably easy to maintain in captivity, and grow well on a diet composed of crushed decayed leaves and wood.  The larvae will grow faster and larger if periodically given slices of fresh apple.  However, to avoid spoiling the substrate, such supplements should be used rather sparingly.
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Chelorrhina polyphemus (3rd instar larva) - Image  C. Campbell

 
Chelorrhina polyphemus (pupal cell) - Image  C. Campbell
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A pupa of C. polyphemus resting inside its pupal cell (the cocoon in which scarabs undergo metamorphosis to the adult stage).  Chelorrhina larvae have a habit of nearly always building their pupal cells against the wall of their rearing containers, using it as one side of their cell.  If a transparent container such as a glass terrarium or clear plastic box is used, this can provide the opportunity to easily observe the transformation.
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The photo at right is of a male Mecynorhina oberthueri, a genus which is very closely related to Chelorrhina. M. oberthueri is considered by many coleopterists to be one of the most beautiful beetles in the world.  In fact, it is sometimes referred to as "The Treasure of Tanzania", that country being the region in which this species is found.

Photo courtesy of Thomas Libich.

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Mecynorhina oberthueri (male) - Image  Thomas Libich

 
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