.
THE THYLACINE IN CAPTIVITY:
- ZOOS, CIRCUSES AND MENAGERIES -
INTERNATIONALLY (page 7)
.

 
.
Bronx Zoo [New York]:

    The Bronx Zoo in New York City exhibited a total of four thylacines between 1902 and 1919, with a fifth that died transit.

.
.
Thylacines displayed at the Bronx Zoo [New York, NY] (1902 - 1919)
.
N Date of arrival A/J/P Sex Captured by Source Capture locality Sold / exchanged Date of death Ref FN
.
1 17/12/1902 A M Unknown captor Carl Hagenbeck [Hamburg]
(dealer)
Unknown locality N/A 17/8/1908
2 26/1/1912 A M George Wainwright Beaumaris Zoo [SB] (transit via London Zoo) Woolnorth N/A 20/11/1912
3 7/11/1916 A M Unknown captor  E. S. Joseph [Sydney]
(dealer)
Unknown locality N/A 13/11/1916
Died in transit A F Unknown captor E. S. Joseph [Sydney]
(dealer)
Unknown locality Died in transit 1
4 14/7/1917 A F Mr. Bourke Beaumaris Zoo [SB] transit via E. S. Joseph [Sydney]
(dealer)
Near Wynyard N/A 13/9/1919
.
A/J/P Adult / Juvenile / Pup
Dead on arrival / died in transit
Short dates are formatted Day/Month/Year.
Footnotes: 1. Arrived alive aboard SS Niagara in Canada on route to New York, but died in transit between Victoria (British Colombia) and New York.
.
.
    The first of the Bronx Zoo's four thylacines were obtained from Carl Hagenbeck, the famous German animal dealer, arriving at the zoo on the 17th December 1902.  A photograph of the young male taken shortly after its arrival is shown below.
.
male thylacine - Bronx Zoo (circa 1902)
.
Male thylacine exhibited at the Bronx Zoo, circa 1902.  Courtesy: Zoological Society of New York.
.
male thylacine - Bronx Zoo (1903)
.
Another photo of the same male, 1903.  Courtesy: Zoological Society of New York.
.
    The zoo's second thylacine, also a male, was transited through London before its arrival in New York on the 26th January 1912.  This thylacine was one of a litter of three pups together with their mother displayed at the Beaumaris Zoo (Sandy Bay) from July 1909.  The family group was photographed by Williamson in January of 1910, with the Bronx male at the far left of the photograph.
.
thylacine family - Beaumaris Zoo (1910)
.
Thylacine family group at Beaumaris Zoo (Sandy Bay) with Bronx Zoo male at far left.  A photo of this same group when somewhat younger can be seen here. Photo: Williamson - January 1910.

        The zoo's third thylacine, a male, arrived at the zoo on the 7th November 1916 in poor condition, and died seven days later on the 13th November.  This thylacine, together with a female, arrived safely in North America from Sydney aboard the S.S. Niagara.  The ship docked in Victoria (British Columbia) carrying a consignment of marsupials, birds and reptiles for the animal dealer Ellis Joseph.  Unfortunately, the female thylacine died in transit on her journey between Canada and New York.  The arrival of Joseph's consignment in Canada is noted in an article entitled "Interesting Animals at Victoria, British Columbia, Canada" by James G. French in Hamlyn's Menagerie Magazine [Dec 1916 (Vol. 2; No. 8)]:

    "On the 24th of August of this year, the s.s. "Niagara," of the New Zealand Steamship Co., brought over a large and varied collection of specimens from Sydney, Australia, consisting of ninety three species of mammals, birds and reptiles, the property of Mr. Ellis S. Joseph, a cosmopolitan collector of wide experience and much ability.  As this collection arrived from Australia, we naturally give the Marsupials our first consideration, and their boxes contained not only many specimens, but were rich in species of great interest rarely represented in our public Zoos.  Taking the polyprotodonts first we have two fine examples of that now almost extinct animal, the
.
Map of Bronx Zoo, 1907.
Place your pointer over the map to magnify.
Thylacine, or marsupial wolf of Tasmania, male and female, and ten specimens of the Black Dasyure, commonly known as the Tasmanian Devil.  In Diprotodonts the collection contained some really fine specimens of Kangaroos, eighteen large greys and seven reds, also Wallaroos, of which there are ten examples.  Two Black Kangaroos from Kangaroo Island are looking remarkably well after their long journey, and the fifty-two Wallabies are made up by the following specimens: - two Parrys Wallaby, two rufus necked, two Parmas, two Rufus bellied, four Agiles, four Black Swamps, two Nail Tails, eight Bennetts, and twenty-six Rock Wallabies.  Mr. Joseph also has two male specimens of the Queensland Tree Kangaroo, which appear well kept hardy animals, and are standing- confinement well.  Wombats are very seldom brought to any part of America, but we can now boast of ten specimens of which three show melanistic tendencies, one large female, who carries a big- baby in her pouch, being almost jet black.  The young one is also very dark coloured.  The Phalangers brought over in
this shipment would appear to offer a favourable opportunity to some enterprising American fur farmer who wants to start a 'possum ranch, there being nineteen grey Australian opossums, one Albino, and ten of the dark form from Tasmania.  Also seven Squirrel flying Phalangers, a pretty and interesting little animal, which few menagerie owners have included in their collections.  Of the other peculiarly Australian class, the Monotremes, two animals left Sydney, one Duck- billed Platypus and one Echidna, or porcupine anteater, but only the latter arrived alive."

    The last of the Bronx Zoo's thylacines, a female, was purchased by Ellis Joseph from the Beaumaris Zoo (SB) on the 14th April 1917 for the sum of £25.  The animal was then resold to the Bronx Zoo, arriving on the 14th July 1917.  It died on the 13th September 1919.

   William Hornaday, the zoo's director, noted that when Mr. Le Souëf (director of the Melbourne Zoo) stood before the cage of the thylacine on a visit to New York, he expressed surprise at the sight of the animal and then said:

    "I advise you to take excellent care of that specimen; for when it is gone, you never will get another.  The species soon will be extinct."

    The Bronx Zoo's thylacines were housed in the fox dens, marked number 23 (in red) on the map of the zoo above.

Asia:

Madras Zoo [Vandalur, India]:

.
Thylacines displayed at the Madras Zoo (1886 - ?)
.
N Date of arrival A/J/P Sex Captured by Source Capture locality Sold / exchanged Date of death Ref FN
.
1 1886 A ? Unknown captor Adelaide Zoo Bridport N/A ? 1
2 1886 A ? Unknown captor Adelaide Zoo Unknown locality N/A ? 1
.
A/J/P Adult / Juvenile / Pup
Short dates are formatted Day/Month/Year.
References: 1. Originally sourced from the City Park Zoo in Launceston (Paddle, 2012).
.
.
    Madras Zoo, now referred to as the Arignar Anna Zoological Park or Vandalur Zoo, is the largest zoological garden in India.  It first opened to the public in 1855.  Dr. Bob Paddle (2012) states that the zoo obtained 2 thylacines from the Adelaide Zoo in 1886 in exchange for stock animals.  Unfortunately, records no longer exist to determine the length of the zoo's thylacine display.
.
.
References
.
back to: Internationally (page 6) return to the subsection's introduction forward to: Circuses and Menageries (page 1)


Search the Thylacine Museum
Site Map
Website copyright © C. Campbell's NATURAL WORLDS.
Photographs and other illustrations (where indicated) are © C. Campbell's NATURAL WORLDS.
Other photos and images are © their respective owners.
.